Dr Sabine Langie

FWO-VITO post-doctoral researcher, VITO

External Profile Page

Biography

Sabine Langie is interested in studying early-life exposures to xenobiotic agents and/or specific dietary compounds, and how these can influence the interaction between DNA methylation and oxidative stress/DNA damage plus predispose to pathological diseases later in life. Since November 2012 she has been working at VITO in Belgium as an AXA Research funded postdoctoral fellow on the topic "Allergy: environmental and nutritional programming in childhood". In 2013 she received the Cefic-LRI Innovative Science Award on the topic “Environmental programming of respiratory allergy in childhood: the applicability of saliva to study the effect of environmental exposures on DNA methylation”, which enabled her to expand her research on the developmental origin of respiratory allergy. The use of saliva will simplify the assessment of the impact of environmental exposures on DNA methylation patterns in human biomonitoring studies, especially for children where blood collection is often cumbersome. Prior to her position at VITO, she worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Newcastle University in the Centre for Brain Ageing and Vitality, focussing on the modulation of epigenetic modifications and DNA repair in the ageing brain in mice. Dr Langie's PhD-research on “Nutritional modulation of DNA repair” comprised the full range of studies with cells in vitro, experimental animals as well as human volunteers, and contributed to the field of genetic toxicology since she adapted a modified comet assay for DNA repair phenotyping purposes. She obtained her PhD in 2008.

Memberships

U.K. Environmental Mutagen Society (UKEMS)
Belgian Society of Toxicology and Ecotoxicology (BelTox)
Belgian Environmental Mutagen Society (BEMS)
The European Academy of Allergy and Cinical Immunology (EAACI)
European Nutrition Leadership Programme.(ENLP)
European Registered Toxicologist (ERT)
Former member of The Netherlands Society of Toxicology (NVT)

© 2019 by Molecular Epidemiology Group UK.